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supangle in three glass jars, topped with pistachios and chocolate.

Supangle Recipe (Turkish Chocolate Pudding)

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Supangle is a Turkish chocolate pudding traditionally composed of a layer of cake, topped with a silky, smooth chocolate pudding and decorated with coconut or pistachios. This recipe is incredibly easy to prepare and is perfect for using leftover pieces of cake. And if you’d rather just enjoy the decadent pudding, then simply skip the cake.

supangle in three glass jars, topped with pistachios and chocolate.
Supangle (Turkish chocolate pudding)

What Is Pudding Made Of?

There are several types of puddings and they can be savory or sweet. A sweet pudding is generally composed of milk (and/or heavy cream), sugar, flavorings, a thickener and sometimes eggs.

Dessert puddings can be classified into three main categories1:

  1. Stove top puddings
  2. Baked puddings (bread pudding, baked rice pudding)
  3. Steamed puddings (such as the English Christmas pudding)

As the name implies, stove top puddings are heated on the stove, which is what we’ll be making today. They are most commonly thickened with starch (cornstarch, flour) and have to be brought to a boil, to cook the starch. Puddings that do not contain any eggs or starch are set with gelatin, such as panna cotta.

Turkish chocolate pudding (supangle) in glass cup.

Pudding vs Custard

The difference between a custard and a pudding lies in the way they are thickened and set. They both start off with the same ingredients: a liquid (milk, heavy cream), sugar and flavorings. But a custard will always be thickened with the addition of eggs that coagulate when heated. Two examples of wonderful baked custards are crème brûlée and crème caramel. Cooked-stirred custards that are heated on the stovetop, include crème Anglaise.

A pudding on the other hand is thickened with starch (or gelatin) and may or may not contain eggs. Because of the added starch, puddings are cooked at high temperatures whereas custards have to be heated very gently.

The starch protects the eggs from curdling which is what makes higher temperatures possible.

three jars of supangle, Turkish chocolate pudding.

Why You’ll Love This Recipe

  • Delicious: Let’s start with the most obvious reason! It’s hard not to like chocolate pudding! It is tasty, comforting and has such a wonderful texture.
  • Easy: This recipe is so simple! And you don’t have to worry about taking the ingredients out ahead of time.
  • Customizable: You can really adapt this recipe to make it what you deem the perfect pudding. You can make it richer, sweeter, or thicker etc.
  • Family favorite: If you’re looking for a quick dessert to make for kids, this is it. They’ll have fun deciding what topping to use. I’m guessing sprinkles!
  • Minimal dishwashing: I should have put this point first! If you’re a regular baker, you are probably exhausted from all the cleaning up! Well, you’ll only need to wash one pot and a whisk for this recipe! Just dump all the ingredients in and you are done!
Turkish chocolate pudding in three small glass jars with lid.

Supangle Ingredients

  • Milk: It’s best to use whole milk, for optimal flavor and texture. You can use low fat milk or even non-dairy milk if you prefer but the pudding won’t be as rich. You’ll probably need to reduce the amount of cold water called for in the recipe. How much water to add will depend on how thin and watery the milk you are using is.

If you’d like the pudding to be even richer, you can replace part of the milk with heavy cream (35% fat).

  • Cornstarch: To thicken the pudding. Most supangle recipes call for flour. But I prefer to use cornstarch to make the pudding gluten-free.
  • Sugar: White granulated sugar to sweeten the pudding. You can add more or less, depending on what chocolate you use and your preference.
  • Egg yolk: For flavor, richness and a smoother texture. The egg yolk will also thicken the pudding. I used the egg white to make 1/3 portion of hazelnut financiers.
  • Chocolate: I found it best with semi-sweet chocolate (43% cocoa). You can use whatever chocolate you like. Just keep in mind that if you use a bitter chocolate, you might need to add a little bit more sugar. The pudding will also be a bit thicker. Conversely, if you use a sweeter chocolate, you’ll probably need less sugar and the pudding will be runnier. The chocolate flavor will also be milder.
  • Cocoa powder: We’ll be using unsweetened cocoa powder in combination with chocolate for a wonderful, deep chocolate flavor. I used Dutch-process cocoa powder. The flavor of the cocoa powder will shine through so use a brand you really like.

If you’d like an even deeper chocolate flavor, use a darker chocolate (higher cocoa percentage) or more cocoa powder. This will make your pudding more bitter so add more sugar if needed.

supangle decorated with chocolate and pistachios.
  • Butter: Unsalted butter, for richness and flavor. The butter will also thicken the pudding a little when it cools down. You can add more or less butter, depending on how rich you want the pudding to be.
  • Water: This is somewhat unusual but we’ll be adding cold water to the cooked pudding. This will give the pudding a very nice consistency. It makes the pudding lighter and more refreshing, like slightly melted ice cream (in my opinion!). It will also cool down the pudding faster. But you can skip it if you want a richer, firmer pudding.
  • Cake or biscuits: These are completely optional, for the bottom layer. We love the pudding so much that we normally skip the bottom layer. But my two favorite options were Petit Beurre style biscuits and ladyfingers
  • Topping: You can use whatever you like. Some ideas are chocolate shavings, shredded coconut, chopped pistachios. I used Cappuccino Caprice in the pictures.

Okay, let’s make some delicious pudding shall we?

Step-by-Step Instructions

  • Place the sugar, cornstarch and cocoa powder in a medium-sized pot.
  • Pour the milk in the pot and whisk to combine.
  • Add the egg yolk and whisk once more.
  • Place over medium-high heat (heat 6 out of 9 for example) and bring to a boil, stirring frequently. This will take about 5 minutes.
  • When the pudding starts to boil and thicken, keep it on the heat for about 2 more minutes, to get rid of any starchy taste. Don’t forget to stir so that it doesn’t stick to the pot.

Tip: You should be able to see the marks left by the whisk (pictured left, below). If the pudding is boiling but still hasn’t thickened, you might need to add more cornstarch. In a small cup, dissolve 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch in 1 teaspoon water. Pour into the pudding and boil for one minute. If the pudding still hasn’t thickened, repeat the process.

  • Remove from the heat and add the chocolate. Stir until the chocolate has fully melted then add the butter. Whisk until completely smooth.
  • Let it cool down (in the pot) for 10-15 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent a film from forming on the surface.
  • In the meantime, prepare the serving cups. Optional: Line the bottom of the cup with pieces of cake or tea biscuits.
  • Pour the cold water over the pudding and whisk until shiny and smooth. The pudding will look lumpy and curdled initially but keep whisking and it will get smooth again.
  • Fill the serving cups with chocolate pudding. Let it cool down slightly, if needed, then cover and refrigerate for about an hour, or until cold.

And that’s it! Decorate with chopped pistachios, shredded coconut or chocolate shavings, if desired and enjoy!

More Easy Recipes

Supangle Recipe (Turkish Chocolate Pudding)

4 from 5 votes
Recipe by Tanya Cuisine: TurkishDifficulty: Easy
Servings

3

servings
Prep time

10

minutes
Cooking time

7

minutes
Chill time

1

hour 

Supangle is a Turkish chocolate pudding traditionally composed of a layer of cake, topped with a silky, smooth chocolate pudding and decorated with coconut or pistachios. This recipe is incredibly easy to prepare and is perfect for using leftover pieces of cake (or tea biscuits). And if you’d rather just enjoy the decadent pudding, then simply skip the cake.

Ingredients

  • 60 g 60 white granulated sugar (2.1 oz., 1/4 cup and 3/4 Tbsp)

  • 15 g 15 unsweetened cocoa powder (0.53 oz., 2 Tbsp)

  • 15 g 15 cornstarch (0.53 oz., 2 Tbsp)

  • 400 g 400 whole milk (14.1 oz., 1 and 2/3 cups)

  • 1 1 large egg yolk

  • 50 g 50 semi-sweet chocolate (1.8 oz.)

  • 15 g 15 unsalted butter (0.53 oz.,1 Tbsp)

  • 70 g 70 cold water (2.5 oz., slightly less than 1/3 cup)

  • pieces of cake or tea biscuits (optional)

  • chopped pistachios, shredded coconut, chocolate shavings for the topping (optional)

Directions

  • Place the sugar, cornstarch and cocoa powder in a medium-sized pot. Pour the milk in and whisk to combine.
  • Add the egg yolk and whisk once more.
  • Place over medium-high heat (heat 6 out of 9 for example) and bring to a boil, stirring frequently. This will take about 5 minutes.
  • When the pudding starts to boil and thicken, keep it on the heat for about 2 more minutes, to get rid of any starchy taste. Don’t forget to stir so that it doesn’t stick to the pot. Note: The pudding will thicken even more when you add the chocolate and when it cools down. But you should be able to see the marks left by the whisk at this stage. If the pudding is boiling but still hasn’t thickened, you might need to add more cornstarch (see recipe notes).
  • Remove from the heat and add the chocolate. Stir until the chocolate has fully melted then add the butter. Whisk until completely smooth.
  • Let it cool down (in the pot) for 10-15 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent a film from forming on the surface.
  • In the meantime, prepare the serving cups. Optional: Line the bottom of the cup with pieces of cake or tea biscuits.
  • Pour the cold water over the pudding and whisk until shiny and smooth. The pudding will look lumpy and curdled initially but keep whisking and it will get smooth again.
  • Fill the serving cups with chocolate pudding. Let it cool down slightly, if needed, then cover and refrigerate for about an hour, or until cold. You can skip the chilling step if you are very eager to have the pudding!
  • Decorate with chopped pistachios, shredded coconut or chocolate shavings before serving, if desired.

Notes

  • Make-ahead tips: The chocolate pudding will keep in the refrigerator, well covered, for up to 3 days.
  • Cup measurements: Please note that these measurements are approximate. For best results, I’d recommend weighing the ingredients.
  • Pudding not thickening: If the pudding is boiling but still hasn’t thickened, you might need to add more cornstarch. In a small cup, dissolve 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch in 1 teaspoon water. Pour into the pudding and boil for one minute. If the pudding still hasn’t thickened, repeat the process. To compensate for the amount of water added (if needed), simply reduce slightly the amount of cold water called for in the recipe (70 g/2.5 oz., added in step 8).
  • Milk: It’s best to use whole milk, for optimal flavor and texture. You can use low fat milk or even non-dairy milk if you prefer but the pudding won’t be as rich. You’ll probably need to reduce the amount of cold water called for in the recipe. How much water to add will depend on how thin and watery the milk you are using is.
  • If you’d like the pudding to be even richer, you can replace part of the milk with heavy cream (35% fat).
  • Chocolate: I used chocolate with at least 43% cocoa solids. You can use whatever chocolate you like. Just keep in mind that if you use a bitter chocolate, you might need to add a little bit more sugar. The pudding will also be a bit thicker. Conversely, if you use a sweeter chocolate, you’ll probably need less sugar and the pudding will be runnier. The chocolate flavor will also be milder.
  • Cocoa powder: I used Dutch-process cocoa powder. The flavor of the cocoa powder will shine through so use a brand you really like.
  • Butter: Unsalted butter, for richness and flavor. The butter will also thicken the pudding a little when it cools down. You can add more or less butter, depending on how rich you want the pudding to be.
  • Cake/Tea biscuits: You can use whatever you like/have. I liked it the most with Petit Beurre style biscuits and ladyfingers
  • The cold water will give the pudding a very nice consistency. It makes the pudding lighter and more refreshing. It will also cool down the pudding faster. But you can skip it if you want a richer, firmer pudding.
  • I have not specified that the eggs and milk should be at room temperature as it does not make a big difference. You can use the ingredients straight from the fridge which makes this recipe perfect for a last minute craving.
  • Gluten-free: This pudding is thickened with cornstarch and not flour so it can easily be adapted to suit a gluten-free diet. Just make sure to choose suitable brands that have gluten-free chocolate (and gluten-free cake, if you wish to add the cake layer).
  • Egg white: You can save the egg white to try out the hazelnut financiers if you’d like (1/3 portion). The recipe is very easy and will make about 2 cupcakes (with one egg white). You’ll need 22 g unsalted butter, 22 g toasted hazelnuts, 32 g powdered (icing) sugar, 12 g all-purpose flour and 1 egg white. I skipped all the other ingredients and just used melted butter (not brown butter/beurre noisette). I coarsely chopped the hazelnuts with a knife and just mixed the ingredients (without sifting them) in a small bowl (see step 4 in the financiers recipe).

Bibliography

1Gisslen, W. (2005). Professional Baking (4th ed.). Wiley

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